We have wonderful news. Today, Murphy was adopted. He is the last to reach his forever home of the twelve dogs YHS retrieved from a difficult situation on Nov 10, 2016.

In an area low on resources in northern Arizona, a man took on about thirty dogs that had it rough on the streets. But helping so many is more than any one person can do. This man reached out for help to the animal welfare organization Blackhat Humane Society, which is a part of our New Hope rescue network. Blackhat contacted Yavapai Humane Society and a team from our shelter took swift action.

All of the dogs on property were treated immediately upon arrival. Our team removed twelve dogs that were in the worst condition—starving, ill with parasites and mange, and infected open wounds. We also left 150 pounds of food and later sent medication to help the man with the remaining dogs. Murphy has a special place in our hearts not only being the dog most medically at risk, but being such a trooper in dealing with his horrific state of health.

Of the twelve dogs rescued, Murphy was adopted last because he needed extended care due to the severity of his wounds caused by an extreme case of mange and he was especially emaciated. In fact, the man who rescued Murphy off the streets was saving up to have Murphy humanely euthanized because of his poor condition, but our medical team knew with the right resources and time, he could be saved. During his recovery, Murphy continued his medical treatment, gained strength and enjoyed lots of love at a wonderful foster volunteer’s home (thank you volunteer, Traci!).

Cupid, Sparrow, Roulette, Magic, Zippy, Meeko, Lady, Raven, Chevy, Sandy and now Murphy have regained their health and have been adopted. Atari, a one year old Australian Cattle Dog, is being trained with the group Soldier’s Best Friends to become a service animal for a local veteran. This is another New Hope rescue partner that benefits our veterans and companion animals. These dogs respond well to their training and are happy in their meaningful work.

A $10,000 grant from the PEDIGREE Foundation supported the medical care for these twelve dogs during their treatment and stay at YHS. With the help of this grant, the veterinarian team, volunteers who washed the dogs in medical baths, foster parents, the shelter team, community well-wishers and adopters, we were able to take twelve dogs from awful circumstances to wellness and in their forever homes in just over two months.

We are grateful to all who help our pets in need, greatly improving their quality of life. It is the volunteers, donors, adopters, partners, the community and caring employees that made this rescue happen and our work possible. What impact our mission has made in the lives of these dozen precious pups and what joy these dogs will bring to the people who are now loving them. What a difference your support makes for our organization.

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